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Top 10 (Normal) Struggles When Writing a Novel

http://www.writersdigest.com/online-editor/top-10-normal-struggles-when-writing-a-novel

Top 10 (Normal) Struggles When Writing a Novel

Writing a novel isn’t the easiest thing to do. In fact, it takes hard work, dedication and the ability to occasionally ignore Facebook. But when you’re struggling, it’s important to know you’re not alone. Here are 10 common challenges most of us writers have to deal with from time to time. How many of these sound familiar to you? [Click here to Tweet and share with other writers who can commiserate!]

1. You find yourself in the throes of a title dilemma

Like every author on the planet, I’ve spent endless hours mulling over title options for my work. One strives, of course, to be both memorable and honestly descriptive of the content. But then, by and large, a great title is an art form unto itself and a great title does not necessarily signify a great book.


Warren Headshot-featured

american quartet warren adler - featuredThis guest post is by bestselling author Warren Adler. Adler is an acclaimed novelist of more than 40+ novels, a regular contributor to the Huffington Post and consistently writes about his experience as an independent, self-published eBook author with his own press, Stonehouse Productions. Currently in development for Adler is the Hollywood sequel to The War of the Roses – The War of the Roses: The Children, along with other projects including Capitol Crimes, a television series based on Warren Adler’s Fiona Fitzgerald mystery novels. Learn more about Warren and his new film/TV developments on his website here. American Quartet, book 1 of his Fiona Fitzgerald series is now on Kindle promo for $1.99 through June 24th. Follow him here on Twitter and Facebook.


2. You get 100 pages in a novel and suddenly decide you’re tossing it all

This may seem insane but I normally know whether or not I am on to something good only after being 100 pages into a story. I’m willing to bet some of you go much farther.

3. Your friends think you’ve become a recluse because you spend so much time at your writing desk.

I’m usually very regimented about my writing schedule and typically wake up at about 5 a.m. and start writing until 10 a.m. There have been times, however, where I’ve spent an entire day in my study working on a novel. Little do these friends know the kind of dynamic journey writers go on in their work.

4. Choosing between creativity and money.

We don’t live by money alone. For those who aspire to the high art of literary writing, similarly to painters, composers, musicians, and others who prize, above all, discovering insight into the human condition, we will always put creation over the clink of coinage (or at least find a clever way to bridge the gap).

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